Lufthansa A319 near Hamburg on Jun 16th 2017, smell of smoke in cockpit and cabin

Last Update: December 4, 2018 / 14:54:37 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jun 16, 2017

Classification
Incident

Airline
Lufthansa

Flight number
LH-16

Destination
Hamburg, Germany

Aircraft Registration
D-AILR

Aircraft Type
Airbus A319

ICAO Type Designator
A319

A Lufthansa Airbus A319-100, registration D-AILR performing flight LH-16 from Frankfurt/Main to Hamburg (Germany) with 130 passengers, was descending towards Hamburg when the crew reported smoke in the cockpit. The aircraft continued for a safe landing on Hamburg's runway 33, vacated the runway onto high speed turn off E3 and stopped. The passengers disembarked via stairs and were taken to the terminal.

Emergency services reported they were alerted to smoke in the cockpit. The aircraft stopped on the runway, the occupants disembarked via stairs, all passengers were examined by medical staff, 4 of the crew were taken to a hospital as a precaution. The aircraft was towed off the runway about 30 minutes after landing.

The airline reported there had been a strong smell of smoke in cockpit and cabin, in addition one of the smoke detectors triggered and sounded an alarm.

On Dec 4th 2018 the BFU released their final summary report stating just the facts reporting following technical dysfunction was determined:

The maintenance organisation of the operator examined the left air conditioning system (PACK No. 1) and determined that the cause for the smoke development was a defective air cycle machine. As part of the maintenance work, the air cycle machine and a recirculation filter were replaced. After the components had been installed both air conditioning systems (PACKS No. 1 and 2) were checked. Their proper function, without any irregularities, was determined. On 17 June 2017 the aircraft was released to service.

The maintenance organisation examined the removed air cycle machine and determined the following: The turbine casing showed heavy chafing marks caused by the turbine wheel. The surface was scratched and showed chafing marks caused by the high temperatures the chafing of the turbine wheel had generated.

The dark colour was caused by carbon deposits during normal operation.

The turbine wheel showed corresponding rubber marks resulting from the chafing against the turbine casing. The dark colour at the air intake of the turbine wheel was due to carbon deposits during normal operation.

The thrust bearing showed chafing marks and rubbed-off anti-friction coating.

On the turbine side the disc showed chafing marks.

At the turbine side the journal bearing failed. This journal bearing was an air bearing.

The thrust bearing failed and the disc chafed against the anti-friction coated metal with high rotational speed. This caused the overheating of the air bearing. The failure of one of the journal bearings at the turbine side was identified as the cause of the smoke and smell development. The maintenance organisation stated that such a damage pattern is not unusual if an air cycle machine fails.

During normal operation of the air bearings the metal does not come into contact with the disc. The journal bearing failed and caused a compressor shaft imbalance. It chafed against the inside of the turbine casing. The turbine casing and the compressor shaft consisted of an aluminium alloy.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jun 16, 2017

Classification
Incident

Airline
Lufthansa

Flight number
LH-16

Destination
Hamburg, Germany

Aircraft Registration
D-AILR

Aircraft Type
Airbus A319

ICAO Type Designator
A319

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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