Endeavor CRJ2 at Baltimore on Jan 23rd 2017, engine shut down in flight

Last Update: May 4, 2019 / 20:15:14 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 23, 2017

Classification
Incident

Flight number
DL-4149

Aircraft Registration
N8986B

ICAO Type Designator
CRJ2

An Endeavor Canadair CRJ-200 on behalf of Delta Airlines, registration N8986B performing flight DL-4149 from Baltimore,MD to Cincinnati,KY (USA) with 51 people on board, was climbing out of Baltimore when the crew stopped the climb at about 11,000 feet due to the failure of the right hand engine (CF34), shut the engine down and returned to Baltimore for a safe landing on runway 10 about 25 minutes after departure. The aircraft was checked by emergency services, then taxied to the apron.

A replacement CRJ-200 registration N8896A reached Cincinnati with a delay of 6 hours.

On May 1st 2019 the NTSB reported the right hand engine suffered a fan blade separation causing a loud bang, increased vibrations, turbine inlet temperature warnings and a thrust reverser indication. The crew declared emergency, shut the engine down and returned to Baltimore. Maintenance reported one fan blade had separated, both fan cowl halves were separated and missing, and the core cowl exhibited impact marks. The NTSB rated the occurrence an incident and opened an investigation.

On May 4th 2019 the NTSB released their final report concluding the probable cause of the incident was:

A Bombardier CRJ200 No. 2 engine failure due to the separation of a fan blade airfoil at a low cycle fatigue crack that originated at the forward fan blade pin hole attachment. The separated fan blade had previously undergone a hot form repair and both metallurgical analysis and repair records indicated that the lance/shot peen step required to restore sufficient residual stress levels to the blade material was not completed.

The NTSB reported:

When the fan blade airfoil separated during the incident it was contained by the engine fan case containment system. The fan blade impact with the fan case containment system resulted in a bulge in the Kevlar wrap that damaged the attaching hardware at the fan cowl flanges, and the cowl subsequently separated when exposed to the jet stream. When the fan cowls separated from the engine they impacted the thrust reverser translating cowl and core cowl and resulted in gouging and surface buckling.

The fan blade airfoil separation caused a fan imbalance that led to high No. 2 engine vibration levels. The high vibration levels caused the engine transition case to LPT flange separation, AGB housing fracture, and starter damage.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 23, 2017

Classification
Incident

Flight number
DL-4149

Aircraft Registration
N8986B

ICAO Type Designator
CRJ2

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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