ANA Wings DH8D at Sapporo on Jan 19th 2017, runway excursion after landing

Last Update: February 26, 2018 / 21:41:51 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 19, 2017

Classification
Incident

Airline
ANA Wings

Flight number
NH-1831

Departure
Akita, Japan

Destination
Sapporo, Japan

Aircraft Registration
JA461A

ICAO Type Designator
DH8D

Airport ICAO Code
RJCC

An ANA Wings de Havilland Dash 8-400, registration JA461A performing flight NH-1831 from Akita to Sapporo (Japan) with 21 passengers and 4 crew, landed on Sapporo's runway 01R at about 11:56L (02:56Z) and had slowed to taxi speed near the runway end, when the crew attempted to steer the aircraft left onto the taxiway towards the terminal, the aircraft however skidded moving straight into the runway end safety area and came to a stop in a snow pile about 60 meters/200 feet past the taxiway. There were no injuries, the aircraft received minor if any damage.

The passengers disembarked onto the runway end safety area and were bussed to the terminal. The runway was closed while the aircraft was recovered.

Japan's TSB rated the occurrence a serious incident and opened an investigation.

The airline reported the aircraft stopped at the runway end, the TSB rated the occurrence a serious incident.

Passengers reported the aircraft had slowed down and was about to turn off the runway when it felt like skidding with a car over a slippery/icy road. About 32cm/12.5 inches of snow had fallen in the hours before the occurrence according to weather reports.

Surveillance cameras showed the aircraft was already at a (high) taxi speed when it approached the last runway turnoff to the left, veered slightly left but continued along the runway end safety area nearing the left edge and went into a snow bank, which stopped the aircraft.

The crew reported the runway was iced up and slippery near the taxiway, the aircraft lost traction, skidded, did not respond to brakes and came to a stop in a pile of snow with nose gear deeply buried into the snow pile, the nose gear otherwise remained undamaged.

On Feb 26th 2018 Japan's TSB released their final report concluding the probable causes of the serious incident were:

In this serious incident, it is highly probable that the aircraft overran the runway because the aircraft could not obtain the braking force due to the delay of braking operation start by the PIC and PL (Power Lever) was not set at the Disc position. Moreover, it is somewhat likely that the bad conditions with snow fall around the end of the runway and the overrunning zone contributed to the aircraft overrunning.

Regarding the delay of braking operation start by the PIC, it is highly probable that because the PIC instructed from ATC to vacate from Taxiway B2 at the end of the runway tried to vacate the runway in a short time by delaying the braking operation start. Furthermore, it is probable that the PIC’s misconceiving Taxiway B3 where he just started to vacate as Taxiway B4 contributed to it.

Regarding why the PL was not set to Disc position, it is probable that because the PIC mistook the PL was already Disc position. Furthermore, it is somewhat likely that it was contributed that the co-pilot did not notice PL in different position than normal.

The JTSB analysed that the braking system worked normally, it was highly likely that had the aircraft landed normally as per aircraft operations manual it would have stopped within the runway with sufficient margin. The aircraft touched down near the TDZ marker about 300 meters down the runway at 122 KIAS, ground spoilers deployed right after touch down. The captain however did not apply brakes as they had been instructed to vacate the runway via taxiway B2 at the end of the runway. The power levers had not been moved into the idle position but remained at the about 42 degrees position. When the aircraft passed abeam taxiway B3 the power levers were moved into the idle position and the captain began to apply brakes. The JTSB analysed that the captain had intended to begin braking abeam taxiway B4 and probably confused B4 and B3.

Related NOTAM:
B0297/17 NOTAMN
Q) RJJJ/QMRLC/IV/NBO/A/000/999/4247N14142E005
A) RJCC B) 1701190315 C) UFN
E) RWY 01R/19L-CLSD FOR DISABLED ACFT

Metars:
RJCC 190400Z 35011KT 9999 FEW008 BKN/// M02/M05 Q1016 RMK 1ST008 A3001
RJCC 190330Z 35013KT 9999 FEW010 BKN050 BKN/// M02/M05 Q1016 RMK 1ST010 5CU050 A3002
RJCC 190300Z 35013KT 9999 -SHSN FEW006 BKN050 M02/M04 Q1016 RMK 2ST006 7CU050 A3002
RJCC 190230Z 34015KT 9999 -SHSN FEW005 SCT009 BKN050 M03/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST005 3ST009 7CU050 A3002
RJCC 190223Z 35015KT 9999 -SHSN FEW003 SCT009 BKN050 M03/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 4ST009 7CU050 A3002
RJCC 190200Z 35015KT 8000 -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 6ST009 A3003
RJCC 190142Z 35017KT 3200 -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 6ST009 A3003
RJCC 190130Z 35017KT 2400 -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 6ST009 A3003
RJCC 190123Z 35017KT 2400 -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 6ST009 A3003
RJCC 190100Z 35016KT 1800 R01L/P1800N R01R/P1800N -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 6ST009 A3003
RJCC 190038Z 35012KT 1600 R01L/1500U R01R/1500N -SHSN FEW003 SCT007 BKN009 M03/M03 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST007 5ST009 A3003
RJCC 190030Z 36012KT 1600 R01L/1700D R01R/1700D -SHSN FEW003 SCT009 BKN012 M04/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 4ST009 7ST012 A3002
RJCC 190010Z 34017KT 1000 R01L/1700N R01R/1600N -SHSN FEW003 BKN009 BKN012 M04/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 5ST009 7ST012 A3002
RJCC 190023Z 35013KT 1600 R01L/1700N R01R/1700U -SHSN FEW003 SCT009 BKN012 M04/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 4ST009 7ST012 A3002
RJCC 190000Z 34017KT 0900 R01L/1400V1800U R01R/1500U SHSN FEW003 SCT006 BKN009 M04/M04 Q1016 RMK 1ST003 3ST006 6ST009 A3001
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 19, 2017

Classification
Incident

Airline
ANA Wings

Flight number
NH-1831

Departure
Akita, Japan

Destination
Sapporo, Japan

Aircraft Registration
JA461A

ICAO Type Designator
DH8D

Airport ICAO Code
RJCC

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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