HiFly A332 at Cologne on Sep 18th 2016, touched down short of runway

Last Update: March 15, 2017 / 18:23:26 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Sep 18, 2016

Classification
Accident

Airline
HiFly

Flight number
WW-752

Aircraft Registration
CS-TQW

Aircraft Type
Airbus A330-200

ICAO Type Designator
A332

A HiFly Airbus A330-200 on behalf of WOW Air, registration CS-TQW performing flight WW-752 (dep Sep 17th) from Keflavik (Iceland) to Cologne/Bonn (Germany) with 163 passengers and 11 crew, landed on Cologne's shorter runway 32L at 00:36L (22:36Z Sep 17th), but touched down ahead of the runway threshold. The aircraft rolled out without further incident, vacated the runway at the last exit and taxied to the terminal.

The aircraft remained on the ground in Cologne for 43 hours, then positioned to Beja (Portugal) as flight WW-752P for a safe landing there, but has not resumed service since, 12 days after the landing in Cologne.

Germany's BFU rated the runway excursion a serious incident and opened an investigation.

Cologne's runway 32L is 1863 meters/6110 feet long.

On Mar 15th 2017 Germany's BFU released their September 2016 bulletin (traditionally due Nov 15th 2016) reporting that Cologne's main runway 14L/32R was closed due to work in progress at the time of the approach, the use of the shorter runway 14R/32L was permitted without restriction however.

The captain (58, ATPL, 19,404 hours total, 2,671 hours on type) was pilot flying, the first officer (53, ATPL, 13,142 hours total, 2,745 hours on type) was pilot monitoring, a third pilot (48, ATPL, 9,070 hours total, 3,267 hours on type) was occupying the observer's seat.

While descending towards Cologne ATC queried the crew, whether a GPS (RNAV) approach would be possible, the crew replied in the negative (the aircraft had not been approved for RNAV approaches). Hence ATC queried whether they would be able to accept a surveillance radar approach (SRA), which the crew affirmed. The aircraft was vectored for the approach and handed off to tower.

Tower issued the SRA instructions as needed for the aircraft to remained aligned with extended runway center line and glidepath, reminded the crew to check the gear being down and locked, at 00:34:35Z the first officer reported the approach lights were in sight, tower in turn cleared the flight to land on runway 32L, winds 320 3 knots. The aircraft was descending at about 500-750 fpm rate of descent and 128 KIAS until 690 feet AGL, then the autopilot was disconnected and the rate of descent increased to about 895 fpm.

When GPWS issued the automated call "30" (30 feet above ground) a pilot commented "we are getting slightly low", followed by the computer voice "retard" (signifying 20 or less feet AGL with power levers not in the idle detent). The left main gear of the aircraft touched down 21 meters before the runway threshold, the right main gear touched down 15 meters before the runway threshold and destroyed one of the runway threshold lights, the right hand main tyre received damage as result, too. The aircraft rolled out without further incident.

The BFU reported that after landing the three pilots discussed the landing, the observer commented he saw four reds (on the PAPIs) on short final, captain and first officer however reported they had seen 3 reds one white. All three were unsure whether they had contacted a runway light.

The BFU reported the captain stated in the post flight interview that the approach had been stabilized until 200 feet AGL, then there were a few manual corrections necessary, the PAPIs were blurred but recognizable. They got a bit low, he corrected, the aircraft was stabilized again over the threshold and he put the aircraft down firm, without flare, as he knew the runway was short and wet.

The BFU reported the crew had calculated a runway distance required of 1691 meters using 150 tons of landing mass, autobrakes in medium position, full flaps, runway wet, available landing distance was 1863 meters.

Metars:
EDDK 180050Z 33005KT 2600 -RA BR NSC 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 180020Z 34005KT 2600 BR NSC 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172350Z 33004KT 2600 -RA BR FEW003 SCT060 OVC130 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172320Z 35003KT 3000 -RA BR FEW003 SCT027 OVC130 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172250Z 34004KT 2800 -RA BR FEW003 SCT040 OVC130 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172220Z 35003KT 310V010 2800 -RA BR FEW010 BKN050 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172150Z 35004KT 3500 -RA BR FEW011 BKN065 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172120Z 33005KT 4000 -RA BR FEW009 BKN080 16/16 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 172050Z 33005KT 6000 -RA FEW015 SCT020 BKN075 16/16 Q1016 TEMPO 4000
EDDK 172020Z 34004KT 9000 -RA FEW013 SCT017 OVC130 16/15 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 171950Z 31005KT 9000 -RA FEW018 SCT060 OVC130 16/15 Q1016 NOSIG
EDDK 171920Z 33005KT 9999 -RA FEW012 SCT018 OVC120 16/15 Q1017 RERA TEMPO 4000 RA
EDDK 171850Z 33004KT 9999 RA FEW024 BKN030 16/15 Q1016 TEMPO 4000
EDDK 171820Z 35004KT 320V040 9999 RA FEW028 BKN040 16/15 Q1016 TEMPO 4000
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Sep 18, 2016

Classification
Accident

Airline
HiFly

Flight number
WW-752

Aircraft Registration
CS-TQW

Aircraft Type
Airbus A330-200

ICAO Type Designator
A332

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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