Petro E170 at Tripoli on Dec 6th 2013, overran runway

Last Update: March 30, 2020 / 16:58:39 GMT/Zulu time

Bookmark this article
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Dec 6, 2013

Classification
Incident

Airline
Petro Air

Aircraft Registration
5A-SOC

Aircraft Type
Embraer ERJ-170

ICAO Type Designator
E170

Airport ICAO Code
HLLM

5A-SOC past the end of runway 29 (Photo: OmarAmer AlBarghathi)A Petro Air Embraer ERJ-170, registration 5A-SOC performing a test flight from Tripoli Mitiga to Tripoli Mitiga (Libya) with 2 crew, overran the end of runway 29 while landing at Tripoli at about 10:14L (09:14Z). There were no injuries, the aircraft received substantial (yet nearly invisible) damage.

Photographer OmarAmer AlBarghathi tweeted at 14:38Z, that the overrun happened moments ago.

Radar data show a short test flight departing Mitiga at 09:02Z, the aircraft climbed to 7000 feet for a few moments then returned to Mitiga for a landing at 09:14Z. The aircraft does not show again on radar. Later information confirmed the incident did occur at around 09:14Z clarifying initial conflicting information the overrun might have occurred during a later rejected takeoff run.

Petro Air is a Tripolis based airline and operates 3 Embraer ERJ-170s since 2010, two Dash 8-300s and 6 Twin Otters mainly for oil companies.

Libya's Civil Aviation Authority released their final report in Arabic (Editorial note: to serve the purpose of global prevention of the repeat of causes leading to an occurrence an additional timely release of all occurrence reports in the only world spanning aviation language English would be necessary, an Arabic only release does not achieve this purpose as set by ICAO annex 13 and just forces many aviators to waste much more time and effort each in trying to understand the circumstances leading to the occurrence. Aviators operating internationally are required to read/speak English besides their local language, investigators need to be able to read/write/speak English to communicate with their counterparts all around the globe).

The report concludes the probable causes were:

The flight crew failed to adhere to the basic principles of Cockpit Resource Management (CRM), crew cooperation and mutual understanding sharing tasks to succeed landing the aircraft safely. The first officer and engineer present failed to draw the attention of the pilot flying to deviations from the planned procedures and to the approach to danger.

The CAA reported the aircraft was departing for a test flight, during which the Air Driven Generator (ADG, also known as RAM Air Turbine RAT) was to be deployed and tested. The crew consisted of the captain (62, ATPL, 17,157 hours total), pilot flying, the first officer (29, CPL, 1,100 hours total), pilot monitoring, and a ground engineer responsible to supervise the test without interfering with the tasks of the flight crew.

The aircraft departed runway 29 in visual meteorologic conditions, initially climbed to 7000 feet, then descended to 3000 feet to begin the test of the ADG. Integrated Drive Generators 1 and 2 as well as the batteries were disconnected, the ADG deployed properly, the engineer confirmed the device was working as expected. The aircraft continued to operate in this configuration with the ADG being the only source of electrical power however. The crew established visual contact with the runway and proceeded to land on runway 29 still with the ADG as the only source of electricity on board. The aircraft touched down within the touch down zone, the ADG ceased providing electrical power causing the aircraft to veer right off the runway. The aircraft came to a stop to the right of the right runway edge about 1650 meters down the runway. There were no injuries. The aircraft sustained substantial damage including the fracture of the nose wheel steering mechanism, ripples in the forward fuselage of the aircraft as well as dirt and stones causing damage to both engines.

The CAA analysed that following the successful test of the ADG the crew respective the engineer should have returned the aircraft to normal operating conditions by re-engaging at least one of the IDGs, neither crew nor engineer did return the IDGs however. With only the ADG supplying power, the ADG ceasing to deliver power below 130 KIAS, the aircraft lost all electrical power at 196 feet AGL on final approach when the aircraft slowed through 130 KIAS stopping both flight data and cockpit voice recorders at that point and making it impossible to control the aircraft to keep it on the runway.

Metars:
HLLM 061650Z VRB01KT 6000 SHRA SCT020 BKN040 15/11 Q1021=
HLLM 061550Z 27003KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 16/12 Q1021=
HLLM 061450Z 31005KT 280V340 6000 SCT020 BKN040 16/11 Q1021=
HLLM 061350Z 25008KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 16/13 Q1020=
HLLM 061250Z 25006KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 17/13 Q1020=
HLLM 061150Z 24007KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 16/13 Q1021=
HLLM 061050Z 25007KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 15/13 Q1022=
HLLM 060950Z 25006KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 15/13 Q1022=
HLLM 060850Z 21006KT 6000 SCT020 BKN040 14/13 Q1022=
HLLM 060750Z 20003KT 6000 -SHRA SCT020 BKN040 13/12 Q1022=
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Dec 6, 2013

Classification
Incident

Airline
Petro Air

Aircraft Registration
5A-SOC

Aircraft Type
Embraer ERJ-170

ICAO Type Designator
E170

Airport ICAO Code
HLLM

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
Article source

You can read 4 more free articles without a subscription.

Subscribe now and continue reading without any limits!

Are you a subscriber?
Login
Subscribe

Read unlimited articles and receive our daily update briefing. Gain better insights into what is happening in commercial aviation safety.

Free newsletter

Want to know more and stay ahead? Get our free weekly newsletter and join 4917 existing subscribers.

By subscribing, you accept our terms and conditions and confirm that you've read our privacy policy.

Send tip

Support AeroInside by sending a small tip amount.

Newest articles

Subscribe today

Are you researching aviation incidents? Get access to AeroInside Insights, unlimited read access and receive the daily newsletter.

Pick your plan and subscribe

Partner

Blockaviation logo

A new way to document and demonstrate airworthiness compliance and aircraft value. Find out more.

Virtual Speech logo

ELITE Simulation Solutions is a leading global provider of Flight Simulation Training Devices, IFR training software as well as flight controls and related services. Find out more.

Get updates

Never miss an article from AeroInside. Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter and join 4917 existing subscribers.

By subscribing, you accept our terms and conditions and that you've read our privacy policy.

AeroInside Blog
Popular aircraft
Airbus A320
Boeing 737-800
Boeing 737-800 MAX
Popular airlines
American Airlines
United
Delta
Air Canada
Lufthansa
British Airways