Lufthansa Cargo MD11 at Sao Paulo on Nov 24th 2013, tailscrape on landing

Last Update: February 19, 2014 / 17:31:04 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Nov 24, 2013

Classification
Incident

Flight number
GEC-8258

Aircraft Registration
D-ALCE

ICAO Type Designator
MD11

Airport ICAO Code
SBKP

A Lufthansa Cargo McDonnell Douglas MD-11 freighter, registration D-ALCE performing flight GEC-8258 from Dakar (Senegal) to Sao Paulo Campinas,SP (Brazil) with 2 crew, landed on Campinas' runway 15 at about 08:30L (10:20Z), the tail however contacted the runway surface. The aircraft went around and positioned for a second approach, the landing went without further incident and the aircraft taxied to the apron. The damage to the aircraft needs to be assessed, there is visible damage to the tail skin.

The aircraft is still on the ground at Viracopos Airport (Sao Paulo Campinas) on Nov 26th 2013 20:50Z.

Germany's BFU reported in their November Bulletin released in February 2014, that Brazil's CENIPA have delegated the investigation into the occurrence, that was rated an accident, to Germany's BFU.

The BFU reported that the aircraft was maneouvering to intercept the ILS runway 15 descending through about FL70 cleared to descend to 4500 feet MSL when the first officer (30, CPL, 3,626 hours total, 1,693 hours on type) commented that the aircraft was slightly high on the approach, the captain (50, ATPL, 10,131 hours total, 4,010 hours on type) argued that this would turn out okay. Slats were extended shortly before the aircraft turned final descending through 5500 feet MSL. The aircraft aligned with the localiser at 4400 MSL at 220 KIAS, the flaps were extended to 15 degrees, subsequently the captain ordered "non standard gear down", 5 seconds later the aircraft was handed off to Campinas' Tower frequency and received landing clearance, tower reported the winds at 140 degrees at 14 knots. Descending through 3800 feet MSL the flaps were extended to 28 degrees, the outer marker was crossed about 20 seconds later, the flaps were extended to 35 intermediate. 17 seconds later the captain commented they would disengage the autopilot, the autopilot was disengaged, and the captain ordered flaps 50. At 170 KIAS and 2800 feet MSL (920 feet AGL) the flaps reached position 50, the landing checklist was completed at that time, too. Upon automatic "Minimums" announcement the captain decided "CONTINUE", the first officer confirmed "CHECKED".

About 24 seconds after "MINIMUMS" the aircraft touched down at 152 KCAS producing a vertical acceleration of +1.6G, nose up attitude was 7 degrees, wings were level. Within a second the vertical acceleration reduced to +0.6G followed by +1.3G another second later, both pilots called "GO-AROUND", the pitch attitude increased from +6 to +12.5 degrees within 4.5 seconds.

The BFU reported that according to the flight data recorder all three thrust reversers indicated "in transit" after second vertical acceleration of +1.3G and subsequently reached "deployed" positions, the tail mounted engine indicated deployed for 1.5 seconds, the wing mounted engines for 1 second, then the thrust reversers indicated in transit again.

In the meantime the captain had commanded flaps 28 and called out "she doesn't accept any power", the pitch angle had reduced to +3.2 degrees and began to increase again. The captain ordered "trim, trim, trim, trim up", the sound for stabilizer motion sounded. The speed, that had reduced to 118 KIAS, began to increase again, 28 seconds after touchdown the aircraft became airborne again at 144 KIAS and 15 degrees nose up. The stall warning activated for about 4 seconds. The aircraft climbed to FL070, the crew discussed their options and decided to commence another approach. The aircraft landed safely on the second approach utilizing reverse thrust for about 20 seconds.

The BFU reported that the captain stated in his post accident interview, that he had the impression of a normal approach followed by a bounce. Both pilots called for a go-around, however, when he wanted to push the thrust levers forward they were blocked and could not be moved. Only with use of extensive force the thrust levers finally moved forward with some delay.

The aircraft received damage to the underside of the tail along a distance of 3 meters with skin abrasions through to stringers and clips. Stringers 49L and 49R, the VHF3 antenna and parts of the drain mast of the APU compartment were damaged.

Metars:
SBKP 241100Z 11012KT 9999 FEW048 BKN100 20/18 Q1016
SBKP 241000Z 11010KT 9999 FEW048 19/17 Q1015
SBKP 240900Z 13010KT 9999 FEW048 BKN080 18/16 Q1015
SBKP 240800Z 14012KT 9999 FEW048 17/16 Q1014
SBKP 240700Z 12010KT CAVOK 17/16 Q1014
SBKP 240600Z 13011KT CAVOK 17/16 Q1014
SBKP 240500Z 12011KT CAVOK 17/16 Q1014
SBKP 240400Z 12011KT 9999 FEW048 BKN080 18/17 Q1014
SBKP 240300Z 12011KT 9999 FEW048 BKN080 18/17 Q1014
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Nov 24, 2013

Classification
Incident

Flight number
GEC-8258

Aircraft Registration
D-ALCE

ICAO Type Designator
MD11

Airport ICAO Code
SBKP

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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