ANZ A320 at Brisbane on May 19th 2012, engine shut down in flight

Last Update: May 26, 2012 / 22:18:53 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
May 19, 2012

Flight number
NZ-764

Aircraft Registration
ZK-OJN

Aircraft Type
Airbus A320

ICAO Type Designator
A320

An Air New Zealand Airbus A320-200, registration ZK-OJN performing flight NZ-764 from Brisbane,QL (Australia) to Norfolk Island (Norfolk Island), was climbing out of Brisbane's runway 19 when the crew declared PAN reporting the right hand engine (V2527) had been shut down. The aircraft entered a holding to work the relevant checklists, then positioned for an approach and overweight landing on Brisbane's runway 01 about 30 minutes after departure.

A replacement Airbus A320-200 registration ZK-OJB positioned from Auckland (New Zealand) to Brisbane as flight NZ-6003 and reached Norfolk Island as flight NZ-764 with a delay of 8 hours.

Passengers reported the right hand engine emitted a huge bang together with streaks of flame.

Without identifying her role Mrs. Tracy Smeaton contacted The Aviation Herald in two e-mails claiming the report as above was untrue. Only after The Aviation Herald contacted the airline's press department to verify the role and authority of Mrs. Smeaton to talk on behalf of the airline she identified herself as press spokeswoman for the airline but refused to provide any details about the incident again repeating the claim that the story above was untrue, the engine had not been shut down. She did not at all deny the passenger reports in her three mails to The Aviation Herald, though the airline denied such passenger claims in their statements to the NZ Herald News.

The airline confirmed to the NZ Herald News however, that the engine had suffered power fluctuations.

The passenger reports are typical for an engine surge or compressor stall, which usually sends what passengers describe as streaks of flames or fire balls forward of the engine inlet because of an airflow reversal inside the engine. This airflow reversal obviously causes power fluctuations, hence the airline's press department confirmed the engine trouble as described above in full in their statement to the NZ Herald News.

According to ATC recordings available to The Aviation Herald the crew did declare PAN immediately after the onset of engine trouble reporting the engine was shut down. The aircraft returned to Brisbane for an overweight landing.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
May 19, 2012

Flight number
NZ-764

Aircraft Registration
ZK-OJN

Aircraft Type
Airbus A320

ICAO Type Designator
A320

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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