No Afghan Ariana Airlines Crash, USAF GLEX on the ground

Last Update: January 24, 2021 / 17:34:38 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 24, 2021

Classification
News

Local Afghan Media and International Media report, that an Ariana Afghan Airlines Boeing 737-400 with 110 people on board crashed near Herat (Afghanistan). Herat Tower reported the aircraft belonging to Ariana Afghan Airlines was headed to Delhi (India) with 110 people on board.

This aircraft, Boeing 737-500 registration YA-FGA) is currently enroute at FL330 over India about 150nm northwest of Delhi.

Ariana Afghan Airlines report on their Facebook account that all their aircraft are flying normally, the news about the crash of an Ariana Afghan Airlines aircraft are not true.

The provincial governor reports a wreckage in flames however in the Sadozai area of Deh Yak District near Ghazni (Afghanistan). The governor later added, that the aircraft involved is a foreign national aircraft, no domestic airline, it has completely burned down. One of the pilots was recovered, who appears to be a foreign national. The spokesman for the governor further added, the aircraft crashed on Sunday (Jan 26th 2020) at about 13:15L (08:45Z). The governor added subsequently, two pilot bodies have been recovered from the wreckage, the aircraft is hardly recognizeable having burned down and so far has not been identified.

Afghanistan's Civil Aviation Authority reported they had not received any report of a civil airliner having gone down.

Taliban outlets claim Taliban forces shot a US aircraft down.

The crash site is located in the approach/departure path of Bagram Military Airbase (Afganistan) used by US Military.

The photos below identify a US Air Force Global Express E-11A business jet (outside our coverage). The tail number was identified as 11-9358.

The Aviation Herald ends the research/investigation into that occurrence at this time (Jan 27th 2020).

On Jan 24th 2021 a final report by the US Air Force concluded:

I find by a preponderance of the evidence that the cause of the mishap was the MC’s error in analyzing which engine had catastrophically failed (left engine). This error resulted in the MC’s decision to shutdown the operable right engine creating a dual engine out emergency.

I also find, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the MC’s failure to airstart the right engine and their decision to recover the MA to KAF substantially contributed to the mishap.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 24, 2021

Classification
News

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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