Canada B763 at Madrid on Feb 3rd 2020, engine shut down in flight, burst tyre on departure

Last Update: February 11, 2020 / 21:33:12 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Feb 3, 2020

Classification
Incident

Airline
Air Canada

Flight number
AC-837

Departure
Madrid, Spain

Destination
Toronto, Canada

Aircraft Registration
C-GHOZ

Aircraft Type
Boeing 767-300

ICAO Type Designator
B763

An Air Canada Boeing 767-300, registration C-GHOZ performing flight AC-837 from Madrid,SP (Spain) to Toronto,ON (Canada) with 130 passengers and 8 crew, was departing Madrid's runway 36L when the left hand engine suffered a number of compressor stalls emitting bangs and streaks of flames. The crew shut the engine down, levelled off at 5000 feet initially, later entered a hold at 8000 feet to burn off fuel and had the landing gear inspected by fighter aircraft. The fighter aircraft confirmed one of the left main tyres was blown. The aircraft landed safely on Madrid's runway 32L about 4:10 hours after departure.

The airline already reported the aircraft experienced an engine issue shortly after takeoff, a tyre reportedly ruptured on takeoff. The crew decided to return to Madrid and is currently holding to burn off fuel. The aircraft is designed to operate on one engine. An emergency was declared.

On Feb 5th 2020 the Canadian TSB reported: "During takeoff, rubber from the number 5 main landing gear tire detached. Some debris was found on the runway and others were ingested by the left engine. As a precaution, the flight crew performed an in-flight shut down of the left engine. After burning off fuel to avoid an overweight landing, the aircraft returned to LEMD for an uneventful landing. There were no injuries to the occupants. Preliminary inspection of the aircraft shows damage to the engine and left main landing gear." Spain's CIAIAC opened an investigation.

On Feb 11th 2020 Spain's CIAIAC released first information stating the aircraft was accelerating for takeoff when the tread separated from the aft outboard left main tyre, some fragments of the tread were ingested by the left hand engine. The crew continued and completed takeoff, shut the left engine down and requested to return to Madrid. Due to being overweigt the aircraft remained in flight for several hours to consume the fuel needed to reduce the aircraft's weight to within permissable landing weight. The aircraft subsequently performed a safe landing and stopped on the runway, firefighters cooled the left main gear. The aircraft was then able to taxi to the apron on own power. There was no need to initiate an evacuation, the passengers disembarked normally. There were no injuries. In the post flight inspection damage was found the left engine's air intake, the left engine's blades as well as the left main gear. The CIAIAC is investigating.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Feb 3, 2020

Classification
Incident

Airline
Air Canada

Flight number
AC-837

Departure
Madrid, Spain

Destination
Toronto, Canada

Aircraft Registration
C-GHOZ

Aircraft Type
Boeing 767-300

ICAO Type Designator
B763

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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