Transavia B738 at Ivalo and Amsterdam on Jan 18th 2020, departed and landed with nose gear steering pin attached

Last Update: October 5, 2020 / 10:21:12 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 18, 2020

Classification
Incident

Flight number
HV-706

Aircraft Registration
PH-HXB

Aircraft Type
Boeing 737-800

ICAO Type Designator
B738

A Transavia Boeing 737-800, registration PH-HXB performing flight HV-706 from Ivalo (Finland) to Amsterdam (Netherlands) with 137 people on board, had departed Ivalo's runway 22, had been enroute at FL380 and later FL400 and was about to descend into Amsterdam when the crew declared PAN PAN and advised ATC they had departed with the nose gear steering pin still inserted and would not be able to vacate the runway in Amsterdam. Emergency services in Amsterdam were dispatched with the information "Airport-One: a Transavia Boeing 737 will land op runway 27 with the gear pin still in the landing gear, they will thus not be able to vacate the runway." Mobile stairs and busses were dispatched to the runway. The aircraft landed safely on runway 27 and stopped on the runway. Emergency services reported: "We can see the pin in the nose landing gear indeed!" Maintenance removed the pin, the aircraft subsequently vacated the runway and taxied to the apron.

The aircraft remained on the ground for the remainder of the day and returned to service the next morning about 17 hours after landing.

A passenger reported the captain announced about 30 minutes prior to landing that the nose gear steering pin was still inserted. This had not been noticed on departure from Ivalo due to the slippery ground, so that they steered the aircraft with engine power rather than nose wheel steering.

On Feb 17th 2020 the Dutch ATC Provider LVNL confirmed media reports emerging on Feb 16th 2020, that following the Transavia occurrence (nose gear pin still attached while landing on runway 27) 16 aircraft landed on runway 36C, that was still officially closed at that time. A 17th aircraft was instructed to go around after it was recognized the runway had not officially been returned to service yet. Following the go around the runway was officially released to service. LVNL stated: "On Saturday, January 18, 2020, 16 landings were made at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol on the Zwanenburgbaan, while this runway had not yet been formally made available to LVNL at that time. This was in a 25-minute period. All parties involved were aware of the commissioning of the Zwanenburgbaan. The runway was inspected and the runway lighting with associated stop bars, which protect against unauthorized access to the runway, were switched on. As a result, there was no risk of collision. LVNL has reported the incident to the Dutch Safety Board and is investigating this incident itself."

On Oct 5th 2020 the DSB reported in their quarterly report (quarter 2 of 2020 from April to June), that they are investigating the occurrence, when 16 aircraft were cleared to land and landed on runway 36C although the runway had not been made available. A 17th aircraft on approach was instructed to go around when the controller discovered the runway was not available. The occurrence was rated an incident.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 18, 2020

Classification
Incident

Flight number
HV-706

Aircraft Registration
PH-HXB

Aircraft Type
Boeing 737-800

ICAO Type Designator
B738

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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