RAF AT72 at Trollhattan on Oct 9th 2018, runway excursion discovered 2 days later

Last Update: September 5, 2019 / 17:36:01 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Oct 9, 2018

Classification
Report

Airline
RAF-Avia

Aircraft Registration
YL-RAI

Aircraft Type
ATR ATR-72-200

ICAO Type Designator
AT72

A RAF Avia Avions de Transport ATR-72-200, registration YL-RAI performing freight flight MTL-425C from Szczecin (Poland) to Trollhattan (Sweden) with 2 flight crew and one technician, landed on Trollhattan's runway 33 in night time and crosswind conditions without any apparent incident. The aircraft rolled out and taxied to the apron. Tower as well as two other ground observers reported the landing was "wobbly", however, none observed the aircraft off the runway.

A routine weekly runway inspection two days later revealed a runway edge light was damaged. Another couple of days later it was discovered the runway light had been run over. Tyre tracks were noticed, the width was 4.1 meters. The only aircraft with corresponding width operating at the airport during the last couple of days had been YL-RAI. The tracks and the damaged edge light were photographed and the airport submitted a report to the Swedish Transport Agency.

On Sep 5th 2019 the Swedish Haverikommission (SHK) released their final report concluding the probable causes of the serious incident were:

- The operator and the pilots had not read ATR’s flight operations information message (FOIM) regarding recommended procedures for crosswind landings.

- The operator’s pilots lacked full training in crosswind landings on the aircraft model.

The SHK reported the left hand seat was occupied by a captain under supervision (49, ATPL, 9,200 hours total, 520 hours on type), the commander and line flying instructor (55, ATPL, 9,300 hours total, 198 hours on type) occupied the right hand seat. The captain under supervision was pilot flying.

The SHK reported: "RAF-AVIA’s internal investigation of the incident is dated 13 December 2018. According to the investigation, there were difficulties keeping the aircraft on the runway centre line due to gusty crosswinds. During the rollout, the ailerons were not deflected against the wind, which contributed to the aircraft briefly coming off the runway to the left, out into the grass, and possibly damaging the runway edge light. RAF-AVIA’s report was submitted to the Latvian civil aviation agency10 on 18 January 2019."

The SHK reported the weather at the time of the occurrence: "According to METAR: Wind 230 degrees, 19 knots with gusts of 32 knots, visibility >10 kilometres, cloud 8/8 with bas 3,000 feet, temperature/dewpoint +14/+10 °C, QNH 1,012 hPa. According to AWOS16: Averaged wind speed in the two minutes prior to the incident: 17 knots. The air traffic controller gave the crew an instantaneous wind report of 17 knots direct crosswind on three occasions just prior to the landing. The incident occurred during darkness."

The SHK reported that when the SHK received information about the occurrence, no recordings on FDR or CVR remained available.

The SHK stated: "In 2016, ATR also published a flight operations information message (FOIM) due to a number of runway excursions involving the aircraft model. In the message, ATR highlights the risks of crosswind landings and underlines the importance of accuracy in managing ailerons into the wind, rudder and nosewheel steering (see figure 6 for examples). The message also emphasises the importance of bringing the control wheel forward after landing, in order to increase the steering capacity of the nosewheel."

The SHK subsequently analysed:

At the time of the incident, the operator RAF-AVIA had not yet seen ATR’s message regarding crosswind landings nor integrated the recommendations in its manual system, which may partly have contributed to how the aircraft was managed during the landing. The pilots had consequently had no training according to the recommendations in the message.

One of the pilots has stated that insufficient aileron into the wind was applied during rollout. The flight operations information message from ATR emphasises in particular that aileron deflection into the wind is to be gradually increased as the speed is reduced, all the way to fully deflectted ailerons if necessary. The message also emphasises that the control wheel must be brought forward in order to increase the contact between the nosewheel and the asphalt, thereby increasing the steering capacity.

SHK finds it established that there was insufficient aileron applied into the wind. It is furthermore likely that the control wheel was not sufficiently pushed forward during the rollout.
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Oct 9, 2018

Classification
Report

Airline
RAF-Avia

Aircraft Registration
YL-RAI

Aircraft Type
ATR ATR-72-200

ICAO Type Designator
AT72

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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