Swift AT72 at Palma Mallorca on Jan 28th 2019, temporary runway excursion on landing

Last Update: January 21, 2020 / 16:14:56 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 28, 2019

Classification
Incident

Airline
Swiftair

Flight number
UX-4014

Aircraft Registration
EC-LYJ

Aircraft Type
ATR ATR-72-200

ICAO Type Designator
AT72

Airport ICAO Code
LEPA

An Swiftair Avions de Transport Regional ATR-72-212A on behalf of Air Europa, registration EC-LYJ performing flight UX-4014 from Valencia,SP to Palma Mallorca,SP (Spain) with 61 passengers and 4 crew, landed on Mallorca's runway 24L at about 17:35L (16:35Z) when the aircraft temporarily veered right off the runway colliding with a runway edge light before returning onto the runway. The aircraft rolled out without further incident. There were no injuries, the aircraft sustained damage to its right hand main gear fairing.

The airport reported the aircraft made a minor temporary runway excursion during landing. The damage to the runway lights was immediately repaired.

The airline reported strong gusting winds were affecting Palma Mallorca for days already, they were the cause for the temporary runway excursion.

On Feb 4th 2019 Spain's CIAIAC reported the aircraft veered right off the runway and contacted a signalling element. The remaining landing roll was without further incident, the aircraft taxied to the apron on its own. The aircraft sustained damage to the right side of the fuselage, the hydraulic system and landing gear. The damage was reported as substantial, an investigation has been opened.

In Jan 2020 the CIAIAC released their final report in Spanish only (Editorial note: to serve the purpose of global prevention of the repeat of causes leading to an occurrence an additional timely release of all occurrence reports in the only world spanning aviation language English would be necessary, a Spanish only release does not achieve this purpose as set by ICAO annex 13 and just forces many aviators to waste much more time and effort each in trying to understand the circumstances leading to the occurrence. Aviators operating internationally are required to read/speak English besides their local language, investigators need to be able to read/write/speak English to communicate with their counterparts all around the globe).

The report concludes the probable causes of the accident was:

The investigation determined that the accident was caused by loss of control of the aircraft in ground conditions close to the maximum demonstrated cross wind limit, because this maneouver was not performed according to the procedure published by the manufacturer.

The following factors contributed:

- the lack of communication between the crew members about the cross wind landing technique during approach briefing

- the surprise and shock effect on the crew produced by the aircraft's behaviour after touchdown, which negatively affected their subsequent actions reacting instinctive rather than applying the procedures published by the manufacturer.

The CIAIAC reported that after touchdown the aircraft partially went off the right edge and paved surface of the runway, part of the gear collided with a sign indicating the runway exit S1. The aircraft returned onto the runway and vacated the runway via taxiway S2. There were no injuries, the aircraft sustained substantial damage to the right side of the fuselage which affected a frame, hydraulics and the landing gear.

The CIAIAC analysed that both pilots had been checked with satisfactory results for proper crosswind landing techniques during their initial operational proficiency checks. There was no evidence the captain (43, ATPL, 4,223 hours total, 645 hours on type all in command) had the opportunity to practise cross wind landings during his online training. The first officer (24, CPL, 684 hours total, 267 hours on type) had the opportunity to practise crosswind landings during his online instruction phase. Both pilots also had undergone checks for Cockpit Resource Management with satisfactory results during the operational proficiency checks.

According to the CVR the flight crew maintained active and open communication throughout the flight. The captain was pilot flying and gave the approach briefing to the first officer, however, did not include cross wind landing techniques. The absence of these comments is considered decisive because the steps to be taken during landing and what was expected of each pilot would have improved the safe operation of the aircraft.

The operators training department stressed it was important to include these elements into the approach briefing.

The aircraft's response in the seconds following touchdown, when the wind lifted the right hand wing leaving weight on the left main gear causing a pronounced turn taking them to the runway edge within a few seconds without nosewheel steering or yoke inputs having any effects, surprised both pilots who individually reacted on the rudder pedals and increased power on one engine to correct their trajectoy by asymmetric thrust, which was contrary to the manufacturer's instructions to push the control column forward and into the wind to put all wheels firmly onto the ground.

Metars:
LEPA 281830Z 32022G33KT 9999 FEW020 14/06 Q1008 NOSIG=
LEPA 281800Z 33020KT 9999 FEW020 14/06 Q1008 NOSIG=
LEPA 281730Z 32023G35KT 290V350 9999 FEW020 14/05 Q1008 NOSIG=
LEPA 281700Z 32024G34KT 9999 FEW020 14/06 Q1007 NOSIG=
LEPA 281630Z 32024G34KT 290V350 9999 FEW020 14/06 Q1007 NOSIG=
LEPA 281600Z 32026G40KT 9999 FEW020 15/05 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281530Z 31025G36KT 9999 FEW020 15/06 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281500Z 31027G39KT 280V010 9999 FEW020 15/06 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281430Z 31021G33KT 280V340 9999 FEW020 15/05 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281400Z 30016KT 270V340 9999 FEW020 15/05 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281330Z 29016KT 240V320 9999 FEW020 15/06 Q1006 NOSIG=
LEPA 281300Z 29016G26KT 250V340 9999 FEW020 16/05 Q1006 NOSIG=
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jan 28, 2019

Classification
Incident

Airline
Swiftair

Flight number
UX-4014

Aircraft Registration
EC-LYJ

Aircraft Type
ATR ATR-72-200

ICAO Type Designator
AT72

Airport ICAO Code
LEPA

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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