SCAT B752 at Almaty on Jul 26th 2018, tail strike on go-around

Last Update: February 21, 2020 / 15:02:54 GMT/Zulu time

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Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jul 26, 2018

Classification
Incident

Flight number
DV-5038

Aircraft Registration
UP-B5705

Aircraft Type
Boeing 757-200

ICAO Type Designator
B752

A SCAT Airlines Boeing 757-200, registration UP-B5705 performing flight DV-5038 from Hurghada (Egypt) to Almaty (Kazakhstan) with 236 passengers and 9 crew, touched down on runway 23L at 22:28L (16:28Z) but struck its tail onto the runway surface and went around. The aircraft positioned for another approach to runway 23L and landed without further incident about 25 minutes later. There were no injuries, the aircraft sustained substantial damage.

Kazakhstan's Civil Aviation Authority reported there were no injuries, the CAA opened an investigation.

The occurrence aircraft is still on the ground in Almaty about 37 hours after landing.

On Nov 28th 2018 (only discovered on Feb 21st 2020) Kazakhstan's Aviation Incident Investigation Office (AIIO) released their final report in Russian only (Editorial note: to serve the purpose of global prevention of the repeat of causes leading to an occurrence an additional timely release of all occurrence reports in the only world spanning aviation language English would be necessary, a Russian only release does not achieve this purpose as set by ICAO annex 13 and just forces many aviators to waste much more time and effort each in trying to understand the circumstances leading to the occurrence. Aviators operating internationally are required to read/speak English besides their local language, investigators need to be able to read/write/speak English to communicate with their counterparts all around the globe).

The report concludes the probable cause of the accident was:

The main cause of the accident with the Boeing 757-200 registration UP-B5705 was piloting errors, in particular in the premature retraction of flaps from landing position while the aircraft was about to climb again for the go around, which caused the reduction of lift and a descent of the aircraft.

Contributing factors to the accident were:

- crew fatigue during the flight Almaty - Hurghada - Almaty with one crew in one day

- touch down 935 meters past the threshold of runway 23L

- low level of crew interaction (CRM)

The decision to go around was taken by the commander of the aircraft, most likely due to an unstabilized landing that developed during the first seconds of landing due to erroneous actions by the first officer.

The AIIO reported the flight crew had not been cleared for this rotation by both the chief pilot and director of flight operations of the airline. The rest before the flight did not permit to restore the required level of (human) performance needed to ensure safe conduct of the flight.

The crew had arrived at Almaty Airport for the flight to Hurghada at 01:20Z, 46 minutes prior to scheduled departure of the flight. The aircraft landed in Hurghada at about 08:00Z. The crew subsequently performed the preflight preparations collecting weather information etc. The aircraft's takeoff mass was computed at 107.43 tons (MTOW 113.4 tons), mass and balance was within required limits. The aircraft departed Hurghada at 10:55Z. The flight to Almaty was without incident, all ATC instructions were carried out properly.

The aircraft crossed the runway threshold and the touch down zone, about 7-8 seconds later the thrust was reduced to idle, the indicated airspeed began to drop to about 128 KIAS, the aircraft began to rapidly sink and touched down 935 meters past the runway threshold. Upon touchdown the elevators were moved however to climb again and the aircraft bounced contacting the runway surface 4 times with vertical loads between -0.96G and +1.6G over the next 13-14 seconds, the FDR showed in all cases the crew commanded nose up just as the aircraft became airborne again after the bounce. Unable to cope with the progressive bounces the commander initiated a go around, during the go around the tail section of the aircraft contacted the runway surface resulting in substantial damage. The aircraft finally landed at 16:47Z.

The captain (32, ATPL, 4,416 hours total, 2,898 hours on type thereof 1,495 in command) was pilot monitoring, the first officer (25, CPL, 1,232 hours total, 1,071 hours on type) was pilot flying.

The AIIO analysed that the weather was suitable for ILS Cat 1 operation. The aircraft intercepted the localizer runway 23L about 10nm before touchdown and was handed off to tower. About 8nm before touchdown the landing gear was lowered and the flaps set to 20 degrees at 165 KIAS. Tower cleared the aircraft to landing indicating variable winds at 2 knots, flaps were deployed to 30 degrees at 142 KIAS. The aircraft crossed the ILS marker 0.66nm before the threshold at 240 feet AGL, 230 degrees magnetic and 142 KIAS maintaining the 3 degrees glideslope. The aircraft crossed the runway threshold at 90 feet AGL and 141 KIAS. 8 seconds alter the thrust levers were pulled to idle, another 5 seconds later the main gear touched down at 128 KIAS, 4.2 degrees nose up and +1.3G vertical acceleration. A second later the elevators moved nose up, the pitch increased and the gear struts became uncompressed again. The elevators moved nose down, 2.6 seconds after the gear uncompressed signal the main gear touched down again at 3 degrees nose up and +1.28G. Again the pitch increased, at 4.6 degrees nose up the great struts were uncompressed again, a nose down input occurred, the aircraft touched down again after 1 second at 3.6 degrees nose up and +1.38G, the pitch again increased to about +5.3 degrees, the aircraft became airborne again, a nose down input occurred, the pitch reduced to +4.4 degrees and the aircraft touched down a fourth time at +1.29G, another nose up input though lesser than the previous occurred, the aircraft again lifted off for about one second at pitch angles up to +6.9 degrees, touched down a 5th time now remaining on the ground for about 3.5 seconds, the the pitch ange consistently and slowly increased to 11.4 degrees nose up, a nose dowin input occurred and the gear indicated compressed for another time at 11.4 degrees nose up. The aircraft settled in the go around and climbed out.

The AIIO analysed that the crew duty time was 16.5 hours and flying time 11.25 hours, while the regulations of Kazakhstan permitted 13 hours duty time and 10 hours flight time only. The crew duty time thus exceeded the legal limit by 3.5 hours and the flying time 1.25 hours causing fatigue and being a gross violation of the rules for working times and crew rest.

Related NOTAM:
K3736/18 NOTAMN
Q) UAAA/QMRLC/IV/NBO/A /000/999/4321N07703E005
A) UAAA B) 1806220300 C) 1809221000
E) RWY 05L/23R CLSD.

METARs:
UAAA 261800Z 16002MPS 9999 FEW100 SCT200 17/06 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261730Z 16003MPS 9999 FEW100 SCT200 17/07 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261700Z 16003MPS 9999 FEW100 SCT200 17/07 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261630Z 16002MPS 9999 FEW100 SCT200 18/08 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261600Z VRB01MPS 9999 FEW100 SCT200 19/08 Q1013 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261530Z VRB01MPS 9999 SCT100 BKN200 20/08 Q1013 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261500Z 13002MPS 9999 SCT100 BKN200 22/08 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261430Z 12002MPS 9999 SCT100 BKN200 23/06 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261400Z 07002MPS 360V090 9999 SCT100 BKN200 24/05 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261330Z 03003MPS 9999 SCT100 BKN200 25/04 Q1012 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
UAAA 261300Z 02004MPS 9999 FEW100 BKN200 26/04 Q1011 R23L/CLRD65 NOSIG=
Incident Facts

Date of incident
Jul 26, 2018

Classification
Incident

Flight number
DV-5038

Aircraft Registration
UP-B5705

Aircraft Type
Boeing 757-200

ICAO Type Designator
B752

This article is published under license from Avherald.com. © of text by Avherald.com.
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